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I have now realised that my sub-par run the other day may have been a sign of an impending cold. Now I feel shattered and am an unhappy ball of snot. BUT, I’m meant to run today (and despite all sensible feelings telling me otherwise, I still want to). So, I’ve been reading a lot more about when and when not to run with illnesses.

ColdTissue

1. Fever – A big no-no. Fighting a fever puts your immune system under a large amount of stress, adding to that by running will only slow down your recovery or potentially make your symptoms worse!

2. Cold or Flu – Symptoms from the head up (runny nose, sore throat, blocked nose) are all fine to run with, if a little unpleasant. Any symptoms involving the lungs (chesty cough, shortness of breath) and you should leave it for at least 24 hours to try and prevent any extra damage, possibly leading to a chest infection. After flu, it can also take weeks to regain full strength, don’t push it too hard.

3. Glandular Fever (Mono) – Don’t do any physical exercise for 10 weeks as it increases the risk of rupturing the spleen (but to be honest I’ve had this and the last thing on my mind would have been running…I was sleeping 23 hours a day!!).

4. Vomiting – Don’t risk it for at least 24 hours as it greatly increases the risks of dehydration and will slow down recovery.

Top Tips to Prevent Illness:

1. Drink 8 glasses of water every day

2. Wash your hands/ use antibacterial hand gel

3. Get a proper nights sleep (7-8 hours)

4. Eat a balanced diet with plenty of fruit & veg

5. Avoid overtraining/ increasing your workload too quickly

6. Get a flu vaccination

7. Don’t lose weight by fasting or low calorie diets

And last but definitely not least…..

8. Listen to your body!

So I’ve decided seen as I only have a runny nose and sore throat I’ll be fine to run, I’m just taking it easy! It’s too beautiful a day not to go out 🙂

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